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Keywords: sound
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (20): jeb243953.
Published: 28 October 2022
.... Highlighted Article: Investigation of underwater hearing ability in multiple sea duck species using psychoacoustic and electrophysiological techniques, with potential for development of effective pinger devices applicable to conversation strategies to reduce sea duck bycatch. Sound Auditory Seabird...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (12): jeb244130.
Published: 20 June 2022
...Grace Capshaw; Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard; Catherine E. Carr ABSTRACT The ability to sense and localize sound is so advantageous for survival that it is difficult to understand the almost 100 million year gap separating the appearance of early tetrapods and the emergence of an impedance-matching...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (24): jeb236489.
Published: 21 December 2020
...G. Capshaw; D. Soares; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard; C. E. Carr ABSTRACT The tympanic middle ear is an adaptive sensory novelty that evolved multiple times in all the major terrestrial tetrapod groups to overcome the impedance mismatch generated when aerial sound encounters the air–skin boundary. Many...
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Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (22): jeb211862.
Published: 21 November 2019
...Chantel J. Taylor; Jayne E. Yack ABSTRACT Many species of caterpillars have been reported to respond to sound, but there has been limited formal study of what sounds they hear, how they hear them and how they respond to them. Here, we report on hearing in caterpillars of the monarch butterfly...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (4): jeb190660.
Published: 20 February 2019
...Amanda A. Lindeman; Jayne E. Yack ABSTRACT Many insects vary their song patterns to communicate different messages, but the underlying biomechanisms are often poorly understood. Here, we report on the mechanics of sound production and variation in an elytro-tergal stridulator, male Dendroctonus...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (13): 2306–2317.
Published: 1 July 2017
...Friedrich Ladich; Hans Winkler ABSTRACT Sound propagates much faster and over larger distances in water than in air, mainly because of differences in the density of these media. This raises the question of whether terrestrial (land mammals, birds) and (semi-)aquatic animals (frogs, fishes...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (14): 2173–2181.
Published: 15 July 2016
...Robert L. Niese; Bret W. Tobalske ABSTRACT For centuries, naturalists have suggested that the tonal elements of pigeon wing sounds may be sonations (non-vocal acoustic signals) of alarm. However, spurious tonal sounds may be produced passively as a result of aeroelastic flutter in the flight...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (21): 3520–3527.
Published: 1 November 2015
...Christopher J. Clark; Richard O. Prum ABSTRACT Tonal, non-vocal sounds are widespread in both ordinary bird flight and communication displays. We hypothesized these sounds are attributable to an aerodynamic mechanism intrinsic to flight feathers: aeroelastic flutter. Individual wing and tail...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (13): 1990–1994.
Published: 1 July 2015
... that the youngest adults (2 weeks post-maturity) have a greater overall neurophysiological response to sound, especially for low frequencies (<10 kHz), as well as a shorter latency to this neural response. Interestingly, when measuring displacement of the tympanal membrane that the receptor neurons directly...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (10): 1572–1584.
Published: 15 May 2015
...Timothy C. Tricas; Kelly S. Boyle ABSTRACT Fish produce context-specific sounds during social communication, but it is not known how acoustic behaviors have evolved in relation to specializations of the auditory system. Butterflyfishes (family Chaetodontidae) have a well-defined phylogeny...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (24): 4283–4294.
Published: 15 December 2014
...Loïc Kéver; Orphal Colleye; Marco Lugli; David Lecchini; Franck Lerouvreur; Anthony Herrel; Eric Parmentier Onuxodon species are well known for living inside pearl oysters. As in other carapids, their anatomy highlights their ability to make sounds but sound production has never been documented...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (19): 3432–3440.
Published: 1 October 2014
...Loïc Kéver; Kelly S. Boyle; Branko Dragičević; Jakov Dulčić; Eric Parmentier In teleosts, superfast muscles are generally associated with the swimbladder wall, whose vibrations result in sound production. In Ophidion rochei , three pairs of muscles were named ‘sonic’ because their contractions...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (17): 3055–3063.
Published: 1 September 2012
.... Rhythmic 20 ms pip trains composed of cosine-enveloped 0.25 ms tone pips at a pip rate of 1 kHz were presented as sound stimuli. The dolphin was trained to remain still at the water surface and to wear soft latex suction-cup EEG electrodes used to measure the animal's envelope-following evoked potentials...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (20): 3538–3546.
Published: 15 October 2007
...S. N. Patek; J. E. Baio SUMMARY The dynamic interplay between static and sliding friction is fundamental to many animal movements. One interesting example of stick–slip friction is found in the sound-producing apparatus of many spiny lobster species(Palinuridae). The acoustic movements of the spiny...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2001) 204 (16): 2827–2841.
Published: 15 August 2001
... bandwidth Q -3dB of over 50. Other pulses showed considerable amplitude and frequency modulation within the pulse. When driven by external sound, burrows resonated at a mean frequency of 3.5 kHz with a mean quality factor Q of 7.4. Natural-size model burrows resonated at similar frequencies with similar Q...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2000) 203 (12): 1845–1855.
Published: 15 June 2000
...William J. Hoese; Jeffrey Podos; Nicholas C. Boetticher; Stephen Nowicki ABSTRACT Kinematic analyses have demonstrated that the extent to which a songbird’s beak is open when singing correlates with the acoustic frequencies of the sounds produced, suggesting that beak movements function to modulate...