1-20 of 24
Keywords: biosonar
Close
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (8): jeb191965.
Published: 17 April 2019
... here: interaction of visual landmarks and path integration in human navigation . Psychol. Sci.   26 , 915 - 924 . 10.1177/0956797615574952 Acoustic orientation Active sensing Way-finding Biosonar Spatial perception Landmark-guided navigation, a strategy by which animals find...
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (8): jeb195446.
Published: 15 April 2019
...James A. Simmons; Shizuko Hiryu; Uday Shriram ABSTRACT In complex biosonar scenes, the delay of echoes represents the spatial distribution of objects in depth. To avoid overlap of echo streams from successive broadcasts, individual echolocation sounds should only be emitted after all echoes of...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (2): jeb189217.
Published: 25 January 2019
... subsequent click is produced, presumably facilitating range estimation from the delay between clicks and returning echoes. However, this click–echo–click paradigm for the dolphin biosonar is mostly based on experiments with stationary animals echolocating fixed targets at ranges below ∼120 m. Therefore, we...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2018) 221 (3): jeb171926.
Published: 13 February 2018
... inherent spatial information, i.e. returning echoes probably originate from the forward direction, and it increases the source-level of the calls by focusing the sound energy in a narrower cone, affording bats a longer detection range ( Hartley and Suthers, 1987 ). Biosonar Acoustic signals...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
In collection:
Neuroethology
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (20): 3253–3260.
Published: 15 October 2016
...Kelsey N. Hom; Meike Linnenschmidt; James A. Simmons; Andrea Megela Simmons ABSTRACT Echolocating bats emit trains of intense ultrasonic biosonar pulses and listen to weaker echoes returning from objects in their environment. Identification and categorization of echoes are crucial for orientation...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (18): 2898–2907.
Published: 15 September 2016
...P. Arranz; S. L. DeRuiter; A. K. Stimpert; S. Neves; A. S. Friedlaender; J. A. Goldbogen; F. Visser; J. Calambokidis; B. L. Southall; P. L. Tyack ABSTRACT Early studies that categorized odontocete pulsed sounds had few means of discriminating signals used for biosonar-based foraging from those used...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (7): 1031–1040.
Published: 01 April 2016
... Highlighted Article: Big brown bats are less susceptible to hearing losses after exposure to intense broadband noise than are terrestrial mammals. Biosonar Echolocation Hearing loss Noise susceptibility Temporary threshold shift Exposure to intense sounds seriously impacts the structural...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (15): 2455–2462.
Published: 01 August 2015
... signal than that predicted by spherical spreading. Biosonar Odontocetes Echolocation Whale Odontocetes, or toothed whales, dolphins and porpoises, produce intense, directional, ultrasonic echolocation signals and use the information in the returning echoes to identify, localize and track...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (9): 1314–1324.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Frants H. Jensen; Magnus Wahlberg; Kristian Beedholm; Mark Johnson; Natacha Aguilar de Soto; Peter T. Madsen ABSTRACT Echolocating animals exercise an extensive control over the spectral and temporal properties of their biosonar signals to facilitate perception of their actively generated auditory...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (16): 2834–2843.
Published: 15 August 2014
...James A. Simmons Big brown bats emit biosonar sounds and perceive their surroundings from the delays of echoes received by the ears. Broadcasts are frequency modulated (FM) and contain two prominent harmonics sweeping from 50 to 25 kHz (FM1) and from 100 to 50 kHz (FM2). Individual frequencies in...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (22): 4144–4153.
Published: 15 November 2013
.... COMPETING INTERESTS No competing interests declared. 23 5 2013 30 7 2013 © 2013. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd 2013 biosonar high-frequency hearing marine mammals auditory evoked potential Extensive studies have described hearing loss from congenital...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (17): 3045–3054.
Published: 01 September 2012
.... 2012 gain control model echolocation intensity compensation bat biosonar Sophisticated forms of echolocation have evolved in two mammalian groups, laryngeal echolocating bats and toothed whales. Echolocation (or biosonar) is an active orientation system allowing individuals to navigate...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (12): 2027–2035.
Published: 15 June 2011
... echo-related AEPs were dependent on the target distances. The echo-related AEP response amplitudes increased at further target distances, demonstrating an overcompensation of echo attenuation with target distance in the echo-perception system of the dolphin biosonar. Measurement and analysis of...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (3): 394–401.
Published: 01 February 2011
...Mary E. Bates; James A. Simmons SUMMARY Echolocating big brown bats emit ultrasonic frequency-modulated (FM) biosonar sounds containing two prominent downward-sweeping harmonics (FM1 and FM2) and perceive target distance from echo delay. In naturally occurring echoes, FM1 and FM2 are delayed by the...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (19): 3100–3107.
Published: 01 October 2009
... they are all thought to employ biosonar ( Au, 1993 ; Evans, 1973 ; Møhl et al., 2003 ; Reynolds and Rommel, 1999 ). A sequence of acoustic events analogous to that described for bats has been recorded from echolocating harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena ( Verfuss et al., 2009 ),narwhals Monodon...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (8): 1078–1086.
Published: 15 April 2009
...F. H. Jensen; L. Bejder; M. Wahlberg; P. T. Madsen SUMMARY Toothed whales use echolocation to locate and track prey. Most knowledge of toothed whale echolocation stems from studies on trained animals, and little is known about how toothed whales regulate and use their biosonar systems in the wild...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2009) 212 (6): 823–834.
Published: 15 March 2009
... range locking on the prey. The biosonar of odontocetes has mainly been investigated in the context of target detection (reviewed by Au,1993 ; Kastelein et al.,1999 ) and discrimination (reviewed by Au, 1993 ; Kastelein et al., 1997 ), and not in the context of prey capture. Nevertheless, a few...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (1): 106–113.
Published: 01 January 2008
..., N. and McCracken, G. F. ( 2007 ). Rapid jamming avoidance in biosonar. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 274 , 651 -660. Griffin, D. R. ( 1958 ). Listening in the Dark . New Haven: Yale University Press. Griffin, D. R., McCue, J. J. G. and Grinnell, A. D. ( 1963 ). The resistance of bats...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (1): 56–64.
Published: 01 January 2007
... ms were also recorded. * Author for correspondence (e-mail: anne.villadsgaard@biology.au.dk ) 25 10 2006 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2007 2007 Odontoceti Phocoena phocoena biosonar target detection click source level inter-click interval bycatch acoustic...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (24): 5038–5050.
Published: 15 December 2006
...,produce two distinct types of click sounds during different phases in biosonar-based foraging. Search clicks are emitted during foraging dives with inter-click intervals typically between 0.2 and 0.4 s. They have the distinctive form of an FM upsweep (modulation rate of about 110 kHz ms -1 ) with a -10 dB...