1-5 of 5
Keywords: Tritonia diomedea
Close
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (14): 2765–2773.
Published: 15 July 2006
... mollusc, Tritonia diomedea , suggests that locomotory ciliated epithelial cells may be under direct electrical control. Here we report that depolarization of ciliated pedal epithelial (CPE)cells increases ciliary beating frequency (CBF), and elicits CBF increases similar to those caused by dopamine...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (14): 2749–2764.
Published: 15 July 2006
... locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc, Tritonia diomedea . Ciliated pedal epithelial (CPE) cells acting as locomotory effectors may be electrically excitable. To explore this possibility we characterized the cells' electrical properties, and found that CPE cells have large voltage dependent whole cell...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (8): 1441–1453.
Published: 15 April 2006
...Russell C. Wyeth; A. O. Dennis Willows SUMMARY Tritonia diomedea is a useful neuroethological model system that can contribute to our understanding of the neural control of navigation. Prior work on both sensory and locomotory systems is complemented by recent field experiments, which concluded...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (6): 1043–1049.
Published: 22 February 2004
...John H. Wang; Shaun D. Cain; Kenneth J. Lohmann SUMMARY Diverse animals use the Earth's magnetic field as an orientation cue, but little is known about the sensory, processing and motor elements of the neural circuitry underlying magnetic orientation behavior. The marine mollusc Tritonia diomedea...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (2): 381–388.
Published: 15 January 2003
...John H. Wang; Shaun D. Cain; Kenneth J. Lohmann SUMMARY Behavioral experiments have demonstrated that the marine mollusc Tritonia diomedea can use the Earth's magnetic field as an orientation cue. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms that underlie magnetic orientation behavior...