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Keywords: Safety factor
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2020) 223 (16): jeb225680.
Published: 20 August 2020
... ). Furthermore, in its current form, the hypothesis includes the concept of safety factor and indicates the thermally vulnerable tissue morphometries where the safety factor is low and may fall below the critical value of 1.0. According to the source–sink mismatch hypothesis, the function of electrically...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (12): jeb206136.
Published: 19 June 2019
... Fossula spongiosa Resilin Safety factor Sexual conflict Tibial setae Attachment to surfaces is a vital component of an animal's interaction with its natural environment. Consequently, attachment structures and the ability to adhere to plant, host, ground or artificial surfaces has been...
Includes: Supplementary data
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J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (11): 1984–1996.
Published: 1 June 2017
... pad, which represents an adaptation to adhesion on smooth surfaces. Accordingly, ticks attached strongest to glass and to surface profiles similar to those of the human skin, generating safety factors (attachment force relative to body weight) up to 534 (females). Considerably lower attachment force...
Includes: Supplementary data
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J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (18): 3388–3394.
Published: 15 September 2013
... increases ( Vogel, 2003 ). The safety factor is a traditional method of quantifying how closely structures approach failure during performance. For example, the strength of a bone may be several fold higher than the forces typically encountered, but approach failure under extreme events such as falls...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (20): 3455–3466.
Published: 15 October 2011
... in opossums also contributes to levels of femoral torsion as high as those seen in many reptilian taxa. Femoral safety factors were as high as those of non-avian reptiles and greater than those of upright, cursorial mammals, primarily because the load magnitudes experienced by opossums are lower than those...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (15): 2603–2615.
Published: 1 August 2011
... MPa; compressive: –18.9±1.0 MPa), and mechanical property tests indicated yield strengths that were fairly standard for tetrapods (157.1±3.7 MPa). Femoral bending safety factors (10.5) were considerably higher than values typical for birds and mammals, and closer to the elevated values calculated...
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J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (8): 1187–1202.
Published: 15 April 2008
... and ground reaction forces(GRFs) during isolated hindlimb footfalls. Further, we evaluated femoral safety factors for this species by comparing our locomotor stress calculations with the results of mechanical property tests. The net GRF magnitude at peak tensile bone stress averaged 0.35 BW (body weight...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (9): 1665–1676.
Published: 1 May 2005
...Andrew A. Biewener SUMMARY To function over a lifetime of use, materials and structures must be designed to have sufficient factors of safety to avoid failure. Vertebrates are generally built from materials having similar properties. Safety factors are most commonly calculated based on the ratio...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (16): 2733–2738.
Published: 15 August 2003
... atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that a single setule can produce an adhesive force (F a ) of 38.12 nN perpendicular to a surface. Consequently, at a total F a of 2.38×10 –2 N and a mean body mass of 15.1 mg, a safety factor (SF; F a /F m , where F m is weight) of 160 is achieved. Tenacity (τ n ; F...
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J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (23): 3273–3280.
Published: 1 December 1999
... is that it sheds little light on the probability of an individual’s survival. * e-mail: [email protected] 18 05 1999 16 11 1999 © 1999 by Company of Biologists 1999 biomechanics safety factor plant stem computation Biologists and engineers agree that load-supporting...
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J Exp Biol (1998) 201 (22): 3057–3065.
Published: 1 November 1998
...William R. Corning; Andrew A. Biewener ABSTRACT To evaluate the safety factor for flight feather shafts, in vivo strains were recorded during free flight from the dorsal surface of a variety of flight feathers of captive pigeons ( Columba livia ) using metal foil strain gauges. Strains recorded...
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J Exp Biol (1983) 103 (1): 131–154.
Published: 1 March 1983
.... In addition, recent work has shown that the material strength of bone is similar in large and small animals. If the assumptions in this analysis are correct, large animals would have a lower safety factor to failure than small animals. The purpose of this study was to measure peak stresses acting in the limb...