1-20 of 24
Keywords: Haemolymph
Close
Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (2): 208–219.
Published: 15 January 2017
... the thorax in flying blowflies by opening the valve flaps during wing upstroke and keeping the inner openings narrow. Auto-ventilation Insect respiration Tracheal pressure Tracheae Spiracles Haemolymph Opener muscle Oxygen supply CO 2 release Respiratory gas exchange in insects depends...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (14): 2201–2210.
Published: 1 July 2015
... to the accumulation of CO 2 . Periodic heartbeat reversals continue during flight, with a higher period frequency than at rest, supporting the transport of CO 2 via the haemolymph towards the metathoracic tracheae and abdominal air sacs. * Author for correspondence ( lutz.thilo.wasserthal@fau.de ) Competing...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (9): 1543–1554.
Published: 1 May 2014
.... In the blowfly, as in other insects with periodic heartbeat reversal, the haemolymph is periodically shifted between the anterior body and abdomen, exerting alternating pressure changes on the compliant tracheae in the thorax and in the abdomen. Simultaneous pressure and O 2 optode measurements show that, during...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2013) 216 (20): 3818–3827.
Published: 15 October 2013
...Austin Browne; Michael J. O'Donnell SUMMARY Ammonia is a toxic nitrogenous waste product of amino acid metabolism that may accumulate to high levels in the medium ingested by larvae of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster . Here we report measurements of haemolymph NH 4 + concentration...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (3): 475–483.
Published: 1 February 2006
...Norman L. C. Ragg; H. Harry Taylor SUMMARY The abalone Haliotis iris retains the ancestral gastropod arrangement of a pair of bipectinate gills (ctenidia). The gills share a single branchial chamber, are supplied from a common haemolymph sinus and effectively support the whole of oxygen uptake...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2005) 208 (10): 1887–1894.
Published: 15 May 2005
... was recorded for Buthidae following severe desiccation. When desiccated, scorpions lose water primarily from the hepatopancreas, while haemolymph volume is more tightly regulated. However,the haemolymph volume of Scorpionidae decreases as a result of depletion of hepatopancreas water stores following severe...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (6): 1017–1025.
Published: 22 February 2004
.... quinquestriatus (571±39 mOsm l –1 ) had higher and less variable haemolymph osmolarities than the scorpionids occupying the same habitats (511±56 and 493±53 mOsm l –1 for S. m. fuscus and S. m. palmatus , respectively). In response to 10% mass loss when desiccated at 30°C, the haemolymph osmolarity of the two...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2003) 206 (7): 1233–1240.
Published: 1 April 2003
... toxic, whereas lack of glucose causes organ failure (presumably of the nervous system), and that sufficient haemolymph glucose can only be generated from trehalose by trehalase. The results also suggest that overt flight muscle trehalase is located in the plasma membrane with the active site accessible...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2002) 205 (12): 1775–1785.
Published: 15 June 2002
... treatments. † Author for correspondence (e-mail: kinseys@uncwil.edu ) 8 4 2002 © The Company of Biologists Limited 2002 2002 arginine kinase osmoregulation haemolymph muscle blue crab Callinectes sapidus crustacean nuclear magnetic resonance salinity The blue crab...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (17): 2349–2358.
Published: 1 September 1999
... osmoregulation hyperosmotic stress haemolymph Hyperosmotic environments create osmotic pressure, favoring the movement of water out of the animal. This, in turn, can cause cell shrinkage and disturb many essential cellular processes. Sea water is the best known hyperosmotic environment, containing high...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (13): 1819–1829.
Published: 1 July 1999
... maturation. The gradual decrease in the relative abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids as the ovaries matured supports previously published results suggesting intra-ovarian synthesis of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Most of the lipids found in the female haemolymph (64.8 %) were recovered...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1998) 201 (23): 3221–3231.
Published: 1 December 1998
..., and the in the haemolymph was 8.2 kPa which fully saturated the haemocyanin with O 2 . The uptake of O 2 by red crabs was diffusion-limited and the diffusion coefficient ( L diff ) varied from 0.53 in resting crabs to 0.8 post-exercise. Post-exercise, red crabs experienced a mixed respiratory/metabolic acidosis which...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1993) 182 (1): 283–289.
Published: 1 September 1993
... haemolymph sodium beetle Rhytinota praelonga . The ability of the tenebrionids to survive the dry season as adults is based on a number of behavioural and physiological adaptations. The adults spend the hot days hidden under stones and logs, where they avoid the high temperatures and low air...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1990) 154 (1): 573–580.
Published: 1 November 1990
...Jon F. Harrison; Calvin J. H. Wong; John E. Phillips ABSTRACT The biochemical basis of buffering in the haemolymph of insects has received little attention, and the chemical complexity of insect haemolymph (reviewed by Mullins, 1985 ) suggests that the relative importance of various compounds...