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Keywords: Burrowing
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (18): jeb242964.
Published: 23 September 2021
... of one aquatic family, all have an at least partly fossorial lifestyle. It has been suggested that caecilian evolution resulted in sturdy and compact skulls with fused bones and tight sutures, as an adaptation to their head-first burrowing habits. However, although their cranial osteology is well...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2021) 224 (11): jeb242244.
Published: 10 June 2021
... gradually and were pointier. Larger and angular particles required higher penetration forces, although intermediate size spherical particles, consistent with coarse sand, required the lowest force. Particle size and head diameter effect were largest, indicating that fossorial burrowers should evolve narrow...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (4): jeb182436.
Published: 18 February 2019
...Yi-Fen Lin; Nicolai Konow; Elizabeth R. Dumont ABSTRACT The interplay between morphological specialization and kinematic flexibility is important for organisms that move between habitats within different substrates. Burrowing is energetically expensive and requires substantial interaction with soil...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2017) 220 (5): 822–827.
Published: 01 March 2017
...Calli R. Freedman; Douglas S. Fudge ABSTRACT Hagfishes are able to squeeze through small openings to gain entry to crevices, burrows, hagfish traps and carcasses, but little is known about how they do this, or what the limits of this ability are. The purpose of this study was to describe...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (18): 2970–2978.
Published: 01 September 2015
...Jessica A. Kurth; William M. Kier ABSTRACT Many soft-bodied invertebrates use a flexible, fluid-filled hydrostatic skeleton for burrowing. The aim of our study was to compare the scaling and morphology between surface-dwelling and burrowing earthworm ecotypes to explore the specializations of non...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (11): 1860–1867.
Published: 01 June 2014
..., we calculate that the force output generated during both circular and longitudinal muscle contraction scales near isometry. We hypothesize that the allometric scaling of earthworms may reflect changes in soil properties and burrowing mechanics with size. * Author for correspondence ( jkurth...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (12): 2072–2080.
Published: 15 June 2012
...Amos G. Winter, V; Robin L. H. Deits; A. E. Hosoi SUMMARY Muscle measurements of Ensis directus , the Atlantic razor clam, indicate that the organism only has sufficient strength to burrow a few centimeters into the soil, yet razor clams burrow to over 70 cm. In this paper, we show that the animal...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2012) 215 (5): 833–844.
Published: 01 March 2012
... of previous studies because it is driven into the substrate for burrowing. There are two different types of skulls in caecilians: (1) stegokrotaphic, where the squamosal completely covers the temporal region and the jaw closing muscles, and (2) zygokrotaphic, with incomplete coverage of the temporal region...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (24): 4223–4233.
Published: 15 December 2011
... Iceland (IC). Frequent burrowing and physiological adjustments to low tissue oxygenation in the burrowed state are proposed to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We investigated burrowing patterns and shell water partial pressure of oxygen ( P O 2 ) in experiments with live...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (13): 2202–2214.
Published: 01 July 2011
...Kelly M. Dorgan; Stephane Lefebvre; Jonathon H. Stillman; M. A. R. Koehl SUMMARY Burrowing through marine sediments has been considered to be much more energetically expensive than other forms of locomotion, but previous studies were based solely on external work calculations and lacked...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (6): 1017–1027.
Published: 15 March 2011
...Elizabeth A. K. Murphy; Kelly M. Dorgan Burrowing marine infauna are morphologically diverse and ecologically important as ecosystem engineers. The polychaetes Nereis virens and Cirriformia moorei extend their burrows by crack propagation. Nereis virens does so by everting its pharynx and C. moorei...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (4): 657–664.
Published: 15 February 2011
...Nicholas J. Gidmark; James A. Strother; Jaquan M. Horton; Adam P. Summers; Elizabeth L. Brainerd SUMMARY Sand lances, fishes in the genus Ammodytes , exhibit a peculiar burrowing behavior in which they appear to swim rapidly into the substrate. They use posteriorly propagated undulations...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2010) 213 (24): 4272–4277.
Published: 15 December 2010
...James Che; Kelly M. Dorgan SUMMARY The polychaete Cirriformia moorei burrows in muddy sediments by fracture, using its hydrostatic skeleton to expand its anterior region and exert force against its burrow wall to extend a crack. Burrowing occurs in four phases: stretching forward into the burrow...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (23): 4198–4212.
Published: 01 December 2007
...Kelly M. Dorgan; Sanjay R. Arwade; Peter A. Jumars SUMMARY The polychaete Nereis virens burrows through muddy sediments by exerting dorsoventral forces against the walls of its tongue-depressor-shaped burrow to extend an oblate hemispheroidal crack. Stress is concentrated at the crack tip, which...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (11): 2103–2113.
Published: 01 June 2006
...Craig R. White; Philip G. D. Matthews; Roger S. Seymour SUMMARY Semi-fossorial animals (burrowing surface foragers) need to balance the competing morphological requirements of terrestrial and burrowing locomotion. These species rarely show the same degree of claw, forelimb and pectoral girdle...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (5): 938–944.
Published: 01 March 2006
... their nostrils. These `flushing movements' were subsequently found to temporarily increase the levels of interstitial oxygen in the soil around the head region. Flushing movements were more frequent while V̇ O 2 was higher during the burrowing process, and also in substrate with lower f a . We conclude...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (13): 2221–2227.
Published: 01 June 2004
... cost of burrowing, an important physiological trait in the pocket gopher, Thomomys bottae , correlates with genetic variability. Three pairs of pocket gopher populations were used, with each pair selected from a different subspecies and comprising one high genetic variability and one low genetic...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1988) 135 (1): 133–164.
Published: 01 March 1988
... increases in length over a period of several hours until the pedal disc finally attaches to a buried shell. Burrowing is controlled by bursts of pulses generated by the through-conducting nerve net. These pulses produce column shortening and peristalsis. Regular intervals between pulses and between bursts...