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Keywords: Antarctica
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Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2022) 225 (6): jeb242773.
Published: 23 March 2022
...Linnea E. Pearson; Emma L. Weitzner; Lars Tomanek; Heather E. M. Liwanag ABSTRACT Allocation of energy to thermoregulation greatly contributes to the metabolic cost of endothermy, especially in extreme ambient conditions. Weddell seal ( Leptonychotes weddellii ) pups born in Antarctica must survive...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2019) 222 (15): jeb206011.
Published: 7 August 2019
... to cope with cold snaps and diurnal temperature fluctuations. RCH has a well-established role in extending lower lethal limits, but its ability to prevent sublethal cold injury has received less attention. The Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica , is Antarctica's only endemic insect and has a well-studied...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2016) 219 (8): 1203–1213.
Published: 15 April 2016
..., Antarctica, to elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide ( P CO 2 ) [420 (ambient), 650 (moderate) and 1050 (high) μatm P CO 2 ] over a 1 month period. We examined cardiorespiratory physiology, including heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output and ventilation rate, whole organism metabolism via oxygen...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2015) 218 (15): 2373–2381.
Published: 1 August 2015
... exposed to a temperature increase of 2°C show an 84% reduction in growth, in contrast to a complete temperature compensation of routine metabolism. Antarctica Climate change Teleost Energy budget Growth Production Thermal tolerance Changes in sea temperature can affect...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2014) 217 (1): 84–93.
Published: 1 January 2014
...Nicholas M. Teets; David L. Denlinger; Shireen A. Davies; Julian A. T. Dow; Ken Lukowiak Abiotic stress is one of the primary constraints limiting the range and success of arthropods, and nowhere is this more apparent than Antarctica. Antarctic arthropods have evolved a suite of adaptations to cope...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2011) 214 (13): 2164–2174.
Published: 1 July 2011
... DeVries for kindly providing samples of Pareledone sp. from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We also thank the Section on Instrumentation of the National Institute of Mental Health for technical assistance. This work was directly supported by NSF IBN-0344070, NIH 2 U54 NS039405-06, NIH 1R01NS64259...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2008) 211 (5): 798–804.
Published: 1 March 2008
... Breuner and Dr Peter Marko for extraordinary logistical support while the authors were in Antarctica. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (ANT-0440577 to H.A.W. and ANT-0551969 to A.L.M.). References Barnes, D. K. A. and Bullough, L. W. ( 1996 ). Some observations...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2007) 210 (17): 3068–3074.
Published: 1 September 2007
...Craig E. Franklin; William Davison; Frank Seebacher SUMMARY Antarctic fish Pagothenia borchgrevinki in McMurdo Sound,Antarctica, inhabit one of the coldest and most thermally stable of all environments. Sea temperatures under the sea ice in this region remain a fairly constant –1.86°C year round...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2006) 209 (24): 5017–5028.
Published: 15 December 2006
... species Sterechinus neumayeri (Antarctica), Evechinus chloroticus (New Zealand) and Diadema setosum (Tropical Australia) spanning a latitudinal gradient from polar (77.86°S) to tropical (19.25°S) environments. We compared rates of photoreactivation as a function of ambient and experimental temperature...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (2004) 207 (21): 3649–3656.
Published: 1 October 2004
... to which the pattern of Hsp expression observed in this species is shared with other members of the suborder. We are grateful to B. Dickson, M. Zippay and A. Whitmer for field and laboratory assistance. We thank the staff at the NSF Crary Laboratory at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, who were essential...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1999) 202 (24): 3623–3629.
Published: 15 December 1999
... of Biologists 1999 adrenaline noradrenaline cortisol tyrosine hydroxylase teleost Antarctica The typical vertebrate stress response is characterised by adjustments in respiratory, circulatory, osmotic and metabolic variables mediated by the release of the primary stress hormones...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1997) 200 (11): 1623–1626.
Published: 1 June 1997
... aerobic diving limit Antarctica catheter time/depth recorder sub-ice observation chamber Weddell seal emperor penguin Aptenodytes forsteri Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri can dive as deep as 534 m ( Kooyman and Kooyman, 1995 ) and for as long as 22 min ( Robertson, 1995...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1996) 199 (4): 973–983.
Published: 1 April 1996
... of emperor penguins nurturing chicks at Coulman Island, Antarctica . Condor 97 , 536 – 549 . Kooyman , G. L. and Ponganis , P. J. ( 1994 ). Emperor penguin oxygen consumption, heart rate and plasma lactate levels during graded swimming exercise . J. exp. Biol . 195 , 199 – 209...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1992) 165 (1): 181–194.
Published: 1 April 1992
... periods while awake and during diving periods with the seals breathing at the surface of the water in an experimental sea-ice hole in Antarctica. Oxygen consumption during diving was not elevated over resting values but was statistically about 1.5 times greater than sleeping values. The metabolic rate...
Journal Articles
J Exp Biol (1988) 134 (1): 61–77.
Published: 1 January 1988
... horizontally imply that krill may have a gravity sense that could help them orient in darkness. 06 08 1987 © 1988 by Company of Biologists 1988 krill photophore Antarctica Euphausia light-following The Antarctic krill, (Euphausia superba) , is a euphausiid crustacean...