The dorsal wings of the Mother-of-pearl butterfly, Protogoniomorpha parhassus, display an angle-dependent pink, structural color. This effect is created by light interference in the lower lamina of the wing scales, which acts as an optical thin film. The scales feature extremely large windows that enhance the scale reflectance, because the upper lamina of ridges and crossribs is very sparse. Characteristic for thin film reflectors, the spectral shape of the reflected light strongly depends on the angle of light incidence, shifting from pink to yellow when changing the angles of illumination and observation from normal to skew, and also the degree of polarization strongly varies. The simultaneous spectral and polarization changes serve a possibly widespread, highly effective communication system among butterflies for intraspecific communication during flight.

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