Without street signs or GPS, animals develop specific and effective strategies for getting where they need to go. To efficiently navigate, honeybees fly lower when facing into the wind and higher when flying with the wind. To understand how some bees determine flight routes despite varying wind conditions, Emily Baird and colleagues at the Australian National University measured whether honeybees’ sight governs their flight paths. They found that bees control their speed and distance from the ground by using different elements of their vision, and that the insects stay on track by making small swerves to the left and right in a wavy pattern.

To measure the insects’ flight routes, the team tracked their height and speed relative to the ground by analyzing videos of bees flying through a small wind tunnel, which enabled them to control the speed of...

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