ABSTRACT

Although corticosteroid-mediated hepatic gluconeogenic activity in response to stress has been extensively studied in fishes and other vertebrates, there is little information on the stress response in basal vertebrates. In sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative member of the most basal extant vertebrate group Agnatha, 11-deoxycortisol and deoxycorticosterone are the major circulating corticosteroids. The present study examined changes in circulating glucose and 11-deoxycortisol concentrations in response to a physical stressor. Furthermore, the gluconeogenic actions of 11-deoxycortisol and deoxycorticosterone were examined. Within 6 h of exposure of larval and juvenile sea lamprey to an acute handling stress, plasma 11-deoxycortisol levels increased 15- and 6-fold, respectively, and plasma glucose increased 3- and 4-fold, respectively. Radiometric receptor binding studies revealed that a corticosteroid receptor (CR) is present in the liver at lower abundance than in other tissues (gill and anterior intestine) and that the binding affinity of the liver CR was similar for 11-deoxycortisol and deoxycorticosterone. Transcriptional tissue profiles indicate a wide distribution of cr transcription, kidney-specific transcription of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star) and liver-specific transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pepck). Ex vivo incubation of liver tissue with 11-deoxycortisol resulted in dose-dependent increases in pepck mRNA levels. Finally, intraperitoneal administration of 11-deoxycortisol and deoxycorticosterone demonstrated that only 11-deoxycortisol resulted in an increase in plasma glucose. Together, these results provide the first direct evidence for the gluconeogenic activity of 11-deoxycortisol in an agnathan, indicating that corticosteroid regulation of plasma glucose is a basal trait among vertebrates.

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