Skip to Main Content

Advertisement

Skip Nav Destination

Editor biographies

Michael Way

Michael Way (Editor-in-Chief)

Michael Way obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK, and received postdoctoral training at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK, and the Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, USA. He was a group leader in the Cell Biology Programme at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany, for 6.5 years before moving to the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute in 2001. The goal of Dr. Way's research is to understand how signalling networks and their underlying machinery regulate cytoplasmic transport and cell migration. He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2005, and Editor-in-Chief since 2012.

Areas of expertise
Actin, cytoskeleton, GTPases, microtubules, motility, myosin and kinesin motors, signalling (phospho-tyrosine and SH2/SH3 adaptor type), viruses.

Kathleen J. Green

Kathleen J. Green (Deputy Editor-in-Chief)

Kathleen Green graduated with Distinction in Biology from Pomona College, CA, USA, in 1977 and went on to obtain a PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Washington University in St Louis in 1982. After carrying our her postdoctoral training in Cell Biology at Northwestern University Medical School, Dr Green joined the faculty of the Pathology and Dermatology Departments, where she is currently the Joseph L. Mayberry Professor of Pathology and Associate Chair for Research and Graduate Education. Dr. Green also serves as Program Leader for the Tumor Invasion, Metastasis and Angiogenesis Basic Science Program of the R.H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Green's research program is directed towards elucidating the structure and function of cell-cell adhesion molecules and their associated intercellular junctions in tissue morphogenesis and differentiation, and in pathological processes such as cancer, autoimmune disorders and inherited diseases. Dr. Green served on the Journal of Cell Science Editorial Advisory Board from 1992-2002, when she became an Editor.

Areas of expertise
Plakins, cell adhesion, cell migration, actin, cadherins, desmosomes, epithelial differentiation, focal adhesions, intercellular junctions, intermediate filaments.

Daniel Billadeau

Daniel Billadeau

Daniel Billadeau received his B.S. in Genetics and Cell Biology from the University of Minnesota – Saint Paul, Ph.D. in Pathobiology from the University of Minnesota – Minneapolis, and postdoctoral training in the area of Molecular Immunology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr Billadeau subsequently became an Assistant Professor in the Division of Oncology Research and Department of Immunology at Mayo Clinic, where he has risen through the ranks to Full Professor. Dr Billadeau is also a faculty member of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and presently serves as the Associate Director for Basic Science in the NCI-funded Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is also the Leader of the Growth, Senescence and Cancer platform in the newly formed Mayo Clinic Center for Biomedical Discovery. Dr Billadeau has had a long-standing interest in delineating the signaling pathways regulating natural-killer-cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation with a specific emphasis toward mechanisms impacting the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. More recently, his work has also included investigations into the mechanisms regulating receptor trafficking through the endosomal network via WASH and the retromer complexes. Lastly, his lab continues to perform studies in cancer biology where he focuses on signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer proliferation and survival as well as pathways involved in generating and maintaining cancer-initiating cells. He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2015.

Areas of expertise
Signaling, cancer biology, immune cells, actin microtubules.

Maria Carmo-Fonseca

Maria Carmo-Fonseca

Maria Carmo-Fonseca received her MD (1983) and PhD in Cell Biology (1988) from Lisbon University, and carried out postdoctoral training at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany. Her current roles are Professor of Cell and Molecular Biology at University of Lisbon Medical School and Director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine, an associated research centre. Dr. Carmo-Fonseca's laboratory combines live-cell microscopy, computational modelling, molecular biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics to study how the dynamic properties of RNA-protein complexes contribute to post-transcriptional gene regulation. She is an elected member of the European Molecular Biology Organization, and served on the Journal of Cell Science Editorial Board before becoming an Editor in 2009.

Areas of expertise
Biogenesis of mRNA, intranuclear sorting, mRNA processing, nuclear biogenesis, nuclear localisation, nuclear organisation, nuclear structure, nuclear transport.

Andrew Ewald

Andrew Ewald

Andrew Ewald received his undergraduate degree in physics with honors from Haverford College. He earned his Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biophysics from the California Institute of Technology, studying with Scott Fraser. He completed postdoctoral work with Zena Werb in mammary biology and cancer at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr Ewald joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2008, and is an Associate Professor of Cell Biology, Oncology and Biomedical Engineering. Dr Ewald studies how cells build organs during normal development and how these same processes contribute to breast cancer metastasis. His lab recently identified a unique class of breast cancer cells that lead the process of invasion into surrounding tissues—a first step in cancer metastasis. His students and fellows are currently working to identify molecular strategies to prevent and treat metastatic breast cancer. Dr Ewald was the 3D Cell Biology Guest Editor on Journal of Cell Science during 2015/2016, and became a permanent Editor in 2016.

Areas of expertise
Epithelial morphogenesis, organoids, 3D cell biology.

David Glover

David Glover

David Glover obtained his PhD from University College London, while working at ICRF, now the Cancer-Research UK London Research Institute. He was then a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Fellow in the Biochemistry Department at Stanford. Following postdoctoral training, Dr. Glover spent 14 years in the Biochemistry Department at Imperial College London, where he briefly chaired the department before taking a personal chair at the University of Dundee, first in the Biochemistry Department and then in Anatomy and Physiology. After 10 years in Scotland, Dr. Glover moved to the University of Cambridge, where he is currently the Arthur Balfour Professor of Genetics, a position he has held since 1999. Since 1989, he has been Director of the Cancer Research UK Cell Cycle Genetics Research Group. His research activities focus on the regulation of mitotic progression, with a particular interest in the roles of mitotic kinases at the centrosomes, kinetochores and central spindle. Dr. Glover has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 1992.

Areas of expertise
Cell cycle, yeast, centrosomes, microtubules, 55kDa regulatory sub-unit of PP2A, APC/C, cdc27, chromosomes,Drosophila, meiosis, mitosis, Polo kinase.

John Heath

John Heath

John Heath was educated at the Universities of Glasgow and Oxford and carried out postdoctoral training at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, and the Department of Zoology in Oxford. Following several years as a lecturer at the University of Oxford, Dr. Heath joined the University of Birmingham as Professor of Biochemistry in 1995, where he is currently Director of Research and Knowledge Transfer in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences, as well as Pro Vice Chancellor (Estates and Infrastructure). Professor Heath's research interests concern the molecular signalling processes that control cell behaviour and their impact on human disease. He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2004.

Areas of expertise
Signal transduction, systems biology, proteomics, receptors, growth factors, cytokines, differentiation.

Caroline Hill

Caroline Hill

Caroline Hill got her Ph.D from the University of Cambridge, UK, where she worked on chromatin structure with Jean Thomas. She then did her postdoc with Richard Treisman at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, UK, working on the regulation of c-fos gene expression by growth factors. In 1995 she set up her own research lab at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, London, UK to study signalling by TGF-beta superfamily ligands. She moved to the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute in 1998, to head the Developmental Signalling Laboratory. She moved to the Francis Crick Institute in 2015, where she is now an Assistant Research Director. Her work is focused on determining the mechanisms by which TGF-beta superfamily ligands signal to the nucleus, their function in normal physiological conditions, in particular in early vertebrate development, and understanding how their deregulated signaling leads to human disease. She was elected a member of EMBO in 2002 and elected a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2019. She has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2020.

Areas of expertise
Signal transduction, growth factors, cytokines, transcription, zebrafish development, cancer, chromatin and epigenetics.

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz obtained her PhD from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, USA, and received postdoctoral training at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Bethesda, MD. Since 1992 she has acted as Chief of the Section on Organelle Biology in the Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch at the NICHD. Dr. Lippincott-Schwartz's research is focussed on understanding how intracellular organelles are assembled and inherited, and how proteins move within cells. Her lab uses various fluorescent imaging techniques to visualize and track molecules and organelles at both diffraction-limited and super-resolution scales. Dr. Lippincott-Schwartz has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2000.

Areas of expertise
Microscopy, membrane trafficking, organelles, ER, Golgi, microtubules, motors, organelle biogenesis and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions, protein trafficking, vesicles, autophagy, mitochondria, ESCRT proteins, actin, dynamin, fly embryo development.

Guangshuo Ou

Guangshuo Ou

Guangshuo obtained his PhD in cell and developmental biology from the University of California, Davis. His thesis work, conducted under the guidance of Dr. Jon Scholey, focused on ciliogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans neurons and elucidated how microtubule-based motor proteins are used to build neuronal cilia. Guangshuo received his postdoctoral training with Dr. Ron Vale at the University of California, San Francisco, where he developed imaging techniques to study neuroblast migration and division in C. elegans larvae and discovered a novel myosin-based mechanism underlying neuroblast asymmetric division. In 2011 he was recruited by the Junior One Thousand Talent Plan Award by the Chinese government as an investigator at the Institute of Biophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences. In 2013 his group relocated to the School of Life Sciences at Tsinghua University in Beijing, and he became a principle investigator of the Joint Center for Life Sciences at Tsinghua and Peking Universities. He continues to study neuroblast development using C. elegans as a model organism. Dr. Ou has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2017.

Areas of expertise
Cell division, cell migration, ciliogenesis, cytoskeleton, motor proteins, neural development and C. elegans.

Giampietro Schiavo

Giampietro Schiavo

Giampietro Schiavo obtained his PhD from the University of Padua, Italy, and received postdoctoral training at the Department of Biomedical Studies, University of Padua, and at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, USA. He was then recruited as junior group leader at the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, where he was Head of the Molecular Neuropathobiology Laboratory. Dr. Schiavo's lab moved to the University College London Institute of Neurology in 2013. The goal of Dr. Schiavo's research is to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal membrane trafficking, and how neurons control the uptake and sorting of ligands in health and disease. Elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2011, He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2007.

Areas of expertise
Neurobiology, membrane sorting and trafficking, molecular motors.

Mahak Sharma

Mahak Sharma

Mahak is an Associate Professor and Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance Intermediate Fellow in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science Education & Research (IISER)-Mohali, India. For her PhD, Mahak obtained her PhD in the laboratory of Steve Caplan at the University of Nebraska Medical Center where she studied the role of EHD proteins in regulating receptor recycling. During her postdoc in the laboratory of Michael Brenner at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA, she examined the trafficking of lipid antigen-presenting CD1 proteins in immune cells. In 2011, Mahak returned to India to establish her own independent research group. Her current research interests focus on the molecular mechanisms regulating membrane trafficking towards lysosomes and how pathogens manipulate the endolysosomal pathway for their growth and survival. Dr Sharma has been an Editor on Journal of Cell Science since 2020.

Areas of expertise
Lysosomes, lysosomal positioning, vesicular transport to late endosomes and lysosomes, Rab and Arl GTPases, Arl8, HOPS complex, Rab effectors, endocytic recycling.

Arnoud Sonnenberg

Arnoud Sonnenberg

Between 1980 and 1988, Arnoud Sonnenberg trained in several laboratories, including the Salk Institute, San Diego, CA, USA (directed by Prof. Dr. R. Dulbecco), and the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, Department of Immunology, San Diego (directed by Dr T.S. Edgington). In 1988, Dr. Sonnenberg moved to the Central Laboratory of the Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Department of Immunohematology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and obtained his PhD from the University of Amsterdam in 1990. Subsequently, he joined the Division of Cell Biology at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, where he became head of the Division in 2003. The main objective of his research is to understand the function of integrins in differentiation and migration, and how integrins and associated proteins regulate the assembly of multiprotein complexes at the cell substratum site in normal and pathological conditions. Dr. Sonnenberg has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2005.

Areas of expertise
Integrins, cell adhesion, intermediate filaments, signalling, hemidesmosome, ECM, focal contact, laminin.

David Stephens

David Stephens

David Stephens received a BSc and PhD in Biochemistry from the University of London. He then moved to the University of Bristol for a postdoctoral position followed by further postdoctoral work at EMBL in Heidelberg. After leaving Germany, Professor Stephens returned to Bristol as a Medical Research Council fellow in the School of Biochemistry. He was subsequently appointed Professor of Cell Biology in 2010. Professor Stephens is also Academic Director of the Wolfson Bioimaging Facility in Bristol and is highly active on both research and teaching roles within the University. He is a member of the Faculty of 1000 and of both the British and American Societies for Cell Biology. Professor Stephens served on committees for both the British Society for Cell Biology and Royal Microscopical Society and until recently was an Editor for Biology Open, a sister journal to Journal of Cell Science. Professor Stephens' lab has made extensive use of cell imaging techniques, notably live cell imaging and electron microscopy, to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying membrane traffic and cytoskeletal dynamics in mammalian cells. More recently his work has included use of zebrafish as a genetic model. The goal of his work is to understand the fundamental mechanisms that underlie cell function in both the normal healthy state and in disease; this has led to his most recent work studying the role of endomembranes and motor proteins in the formation and function of primary cilia. He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2015.

Areas of expertise
Membrane trafficking, microtubule motors, primary cilia, organelle structure, membrane-cytoskeleton interactions, zebrafish.

Tamotsu Yoshimori

Tamotsu Yoshimori

Professor Tamotsu Yoshimori was educated at Osaka University in Japan, where he received his PhD in Medical Science. He was an assistant professor at Kansai Medical University, a postdoctoral researcher at European Molecular Biology Laboratory, an associate professor at the National Institute of Basic Biology and as a professor at both the National Institute of Genetics and the Research Institute for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University. He is now a professor of genetics at the Graduate School of Medicine and a professor of intracellular membrane dynamics at the Graduate School of Frontier Bioscience, Osaka University. Professor Yoshimori's research interests are focused on intracellular membrane trafficking, and particularly on autophagy. He has been a Journal of Cell Science Editor since 2013.

Areas of expertise
Autophagy, membrane trafficking, endocytic pathway, secretory pathway, organelles, ER, Golgi, endosomes, lysosomes, organelle biogenesis, protein transport, vesicles, membrane dynamics, protein degradation, quality control.

James Olzmann (Guest Editor: Cell Biology of Lipids)

James Olzmann received his PhD from Emory University, USA. He did his postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Dr. Ron Kopito at Stanford University, studying the organization of endoplasmic reticulum protein quality control networks and connections with neutral lipid storage organelles known as lipid droplets. In 2013, Dr Olzmann began his independent research group at the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently an Associate Professor with joint appointments in the Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Nutritional Sciences & Toxicology at UC Berkeley, and an Investigator at the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub. Dr Olzmann’s current research leverages interdisciplinary approaches to understand the cell biology of lipid homeostasis, including the mechanisms that regulate lipid droplets and the pathways that govern cellular responses to lipotoxicity.

Dr Olzmann is coordinating the Cell Biology of Lipids Special Issue, due to be published in early 2022. Deadline for submissions is 15 July 2021. Click here for more information.

Areas of expertise
Lipid droplets, endoplasmic reticulum, organelle biogenesis, membrane contact sites, lipid metabolism, lipotoxicity, ferroptosis, protein quality control, ER-associated degradation, ubiquitin, proteome dynamics, genetic screens.

 Back to top

Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal