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Keywords: Hypospadias
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Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2009) 136 (23): 3949–3957.
Published: 01 December 2009
... causes hypospadias. Shh directs cloacal septation by promoting cell proliferation in adjacent urorectal septum mesenchyme. Additionally, conditional inactivation of smoothened in the genital ectoderm and cloacal/urethral endoderm shows that the ectoderm is a direct target of Shh and is required...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2008) 135 (16): 2815–2825.
Published: 15 August 2008
... to promote cell proliferation. By contrast, β-catenin is required in the ectoderm to maintain tissue integrity, possibly through cell-cell adhesion during GT outgrowth. The fact that both endodermal and ectodermal β-catenin knockout animals develop severe hypospadias in both sexes raises the possibility...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2005) 132 (10): 2441–2450.
Published: 15 May 2005
...Anita Petiot; Claire L. Perriton; Clive Dickson; Martin J. Cohn Development of external genitalia in mammalian embryos requires tight coordination of a complex series of morphogenetic events involving outgrowth,proximodistal and dorsoventral patterning, and epithelial tubulogenesis. Hypospadias...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2001) 128 (21): 4241–4250.
Published: 01 November 2001
... very little has been reported for the underlying molecular mechanisms ( Hayward et al., 1998 ; Kurzrock et al., 1999a ; Kurzrock et al., 1999b ). Further studies will be required to incorporate these data to elucidate the mechanisms of human hypospadias because of the differences in GT histogenesis...
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (1987) 101 (Supplement): 33–38.
Published: 01 March 1987
... hypospadias. XX true hermaphrodites are characterized by the presence of both testicular and ovarian tissue and have ambiguous genitalia. They do not have Y-DNA. Several instances of familial XX maleness are critically analysed. In these pedigrees, most of the affected individuals are true hermaphrodites...