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Keywords: Dystrophin
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Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2020) 147 (7): dev186957.
Published: 08 April 2020
... impact on elongation are unclear. We found that Dystroglycan (Dg) and Dystrophin (Dys) are involved in BM fibril deposition. Moreover, they also orient stress fibers, by acting locally and in parallel to Fat2. Importantly, Dg-Dys complex-mediated cell-autonomous control of F-actin fiber orientation...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2009) 136 (21): 3597–3606.
Published: 01 November 2009
... ), which could reflect the fact that talin 2 levels in muscle are higher than talin 1 levels. Integrin Talin Muscular dystrophy Dystrophin Mice Skeletal muscle development and function are dependent on β1 integrins, a family of cell surface receptors that are formed by heterodimerization...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2006) 133 (19): 3805–3815.
Published: 01 October 2006
... epithelial development. As an integral component of the Dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex, Dg plays a central role in linking the ECM and the cytoskeleton. Disruption of this linkage in skeletal muscle leads to various types of muscular dystrophies. In epithelial cells, reduced expression of Dg is...
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2006) 133 (10): 1911–1921.
Published: 15 May 2006
... are fertile but show gonad migration defects in addition to the defects seen in homozygotes, indicating that DGN-1 function is dosage sensitive. Phenotypic analyses show that DGN-1 and dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC)components have distinct and independent functions, in contrast to the...
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2003) 130 (23): 5851–5860.
Published: 01 December 2003
... a dystrophic pathology through disconnecting the cytoskeleton from the extracellular matrix in skeletal muscle by reducing the level of dystrophin protein at the sarcolemma. This is thought to allow tearing of this membrane, which in turn leads to cell death. Surprisingly, we have found that the...
Journal Articles
Journal: Development
Development (2002) 129 (14): 3505–3512.
Published: 15 July 2002
...Michael J. Parsons; Isabel Campos; Elizabeth M. A. Hirst; Derek L. Stemple Muscular dystrophy is frequently caused by disruption of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which links muscle cells to the extracellular matrix. Dystroglycan, a central component of the DGC, serves as a laminin...